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Chemistry at Thomson
 

Courses of Study

 

Grade 11 Chemistry, University Preparation  (SCH3U1)

Prerequisite Course: Grade 10 Science, Academic with mark of 70% of higher is strongly recommended.  Also strongly recommended is Grade 10 Mathematics, Academic with mark of 70% or higher.

  This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of the properties of chemicals and chemical bonds; chemical reactions and quantitative relationships in those reactions; solutions and solubility; and atmospheric chemistry and the behaviour of gases. Students will further develop their analytical skills and investigate the qualitative and quantitative properties of matter, as well as the impact of some common chemical reactions on society and the environment.

Grade 11 Chemistry, University-Preparation,

Pre-AP (SCH3U3)


Prerequisite Courses: 80% or above in SNC2D3 or SNC2D1 with pending approval of Pre-AP Application, available at thomsoncollegiate.com > About Thomson > Advanced Placement.


This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of the properties of chemicals and chemical bonds; chemical reactions and quantitative relationships in those reactions; solutions and solubility; and atmospheric chemistry and the behaviour of gases. Students will further develop their analytical skills and investigate the qualitative and quantitative properties of matter, as well as the impact of some common chemical reactions on society and the environment.


SCH3U3 Pre-AP is different from SCH3U1 University-Preparation in that more topics in chemistry must be learned and in greater depth.  New topics from SCH4U1 include Nuclear Chemistry, Electron Structure, Hybridization in Chemical Bonding, Molecular Geometry, Oxidation-Reduction, and Transition Metals.  


SCH3U3 Pre-AP students must demonstrate strong skills in math (rearranging math formulas, solving algebraic expressions), understanding and solving problems, plus reasoning (ability to analyze information using deduction and inference).


To successfully perform and complete activities using higher-level thinking and student-directed design labs, SCH3U3 Pre-AP students must demonstrate strong skills in questioning, reading, and technical writing (communicating clearly in writing).

 SCH3U Titration 2012.06.05 0.3
 
Grade 11 Chemistry students at Thomson
demonstrating their learned skill of titration
for neutralizing sodium hydroxide.
 

Grade 12 Chemistry, College Preparation  (SCH4C1)

Prerequisite Course: Grade 10 Science, Academic OR Applied with mark of 70% or above is strongly recommended.  Also recommended is Grade 10 Mathematics with mark of 70% or above.

  This course enables students to develop an understanding of chemistry through the study of matter and qualitative analysis, organic chemistry, electrochemistry, chemical calculations, and chemistry as it relates to the quality of the environment. Students will use a variety of laboratory techniques, develop skills in data collection and scientific analysis, and communicate scientific information using appropriate terminology. Emphasis will be placed on the role of chemistry in daily life and the effects of technological applications and processes on society and the environment. 

Chemistry at CentennialCollege 2014.03.06 ls 0.15
 Thomson Chemistry students in Grades 11 and 12 extracting oils from citrus fruits at Centennial College-Morningside Campus in March, 2014.

 

Grade 12 Chemistry, University Preparation  (SCH4U1)

Prerequisite Course: Grade 11 Chemistry, University Preparation with a mark of 70% is strongly recommended.

  This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of organic chemistry, the structure and properties of matter, energy changes and rates of reaction, equilibrium in chemical systems, and electrochemistry. Students will further develop their problem-solving and investigation skills as they investigate chemical processes, and will refine their ability to communicate scientific information. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of chemistry in everyday life and on evaluating the impact of chemical technology on the environment.

 


Comparison of Final Marks

 

Grade 10 Science, Academic and Grade 11 Chemistry, University Preparation

  Analyses of trends of final marks accumulated from 2003 to 2011 (Table 1) led us to suggest that students who completed Grade 10 Science, Academic (SNC2D) with an 70% or above have demonstrated sufficient understanding, skills, and work habits to maintain their successful results in Grade 11 Chemistry, University Preparation (SCH3U).

  Students achieving below a 70% in SNC2D are therefore strongly recommended to enroll in Grade 12 Chemistry, College-Preparation (SCH4C).

Table 1. Correlation of marks of students at David & Mary Thomson Collegiate Institute, TDSB who completed Grade 9 Science, Academic (SNC2D) and Grade 11 Chemistry, University Preparation (SCH3U) in their subsequent academic year.  Data from 601 students was obtained from 2003 to 2011.

  As shown in Table 1, a total of 51 out of 117 (44%) students who earned a mark between 70% and 79% in SNC2D maintained their average or higher after completing SCH3U.

  A lower percentage of students (20% from a total of 28 out of 138) who earned a mark between 60% and 69% in SNC2D earned a mark of 70% or higher after completing SCH3U.  This is important to know as it is an indicator of how successful a student would likely be enrolled in Grade 12 Chemistry, University Preparation (SCHU).  A minimum mark of 70% is required for acceptance to most chemistry programs at universities.

 

Grade 11 Chemistry, Univ. Prep. and Grade 12 Chemistry, Univ. Prep.

  Furthermore, analyses of trends of final marks accumulated from 2003 to 2011 (Table 2) led us to suggest that students who completed Grade 11 Chemistry, University Preparation (SCH3U) with a 70% or above have demonstrated sufficient understanding, skills, and work habits to maintain their successful results in Grade 12 Chemistry, University Preparation (SCH4U).

  Students achieving below a 70% in SCH3U are therefore strongly recommended to enroll in Grade 12 Chemistry, College Preparation (SCH4C).

Table 2. Correlation of marks of students at David & Mary Thomson Collegiate Institute, TDSB who completed Grade 11 Chemistry, University Preparation (SCH3U) and Grade 12 Chemistry, University Preparation (SCH4U) in their subsequent academic year.  Data from 464 students was obtained from 2003 to 2011.

  As shown in Table 2, a total of 45 students out of 97 (46%) students who earned a mark between 70% and 79% in SCH3U earned a mark of 70% or higher after completing SCH4U.

  A lower percentage of students (20% from a total of only 18 out of 89) who earned a mark between 60% and 69% in SCH3U maintained a mark of 70% or higher after completing SCH4U.  This is important to know because the mark of 70%, mostly likely higher, is the prerequisite for admission to most chemistry programs at universities.

 

 


Pathways of Science at Thomson

 

Prerequisites for Enrollment in Future Science Courses

 

Grade 9 Students

  Students completing Grade 9 Science, Applied (SNC1P) with an 85% or above have demonstrated sufficient understanding, skills, and work habits to maintain their successful results in Grade 10 Science, Academic (SNC2D).

  • Students achieving below an 85% in SNC1P are therefore strongly recommended to enroll in Grade 10 Science, Applied (SNC2P).


Grade 10 Students

  Students completing Grade 10 Science, Applied (SNC2P) may NOT enroll in a Grade 11/12 U-level course (i.e. SBI3U, SCH3U, SPH3U).
  • However, Grade 11 Environmental Science - Workplace leve (SVN3E) is strongly recommended for students NOT pursuing post-secondary sciences but need a third science for graduation. 

  Students completing Grade 10 Science, Academic (SNC2D) with a 70% or above have demonstrated sufficient understanding, skills, and work habits to maintain their successful results in Grade 11 University-level Biology (SBI3U), Chemistry (SCH3U), and/or Physics (SPH3U).

  • Students achieving below a 70% in SNC2D are therefore strongly recommended to enroll in Grade 11 and/or 12 C-level or M-level courses.

Pathway chart

 Students completing Grade 10 Math, Academic (MPM2D) with a 70% or above have demonstrated sufficient understanding, skills, and work habits to maintain their successful results in Grade 11 Chemistry (SCH3U), and/or Physics (SPH3U).

  • Students achieving below a 70% in MPM2D are therefore strongly recommended to enroll in Grade 12 C Chemistry and/or Physics courses.

 

Grade 11 Students

  Students completing Grade 11 University Preparation Biology (SBI3U), Chemistry (SCH3U), and/or Physics (SPH3U) have demonstrated sufficient understanding, skills, and work habits to maintain their successful results in Grade 11 University Preparation Biology (SBI3U), Chemistry (SCH3U), and/or Physics (SPH3U).

  • Students achieving below a 70% in SBI3U, SCH3U, and/or SPH3U are therefore strongly recommended to enroll in Grade 12 C-level or M-level courses.

  At the present time, Grade 11 Science, Workplace (SNC3E) is NOT available.  However, Grade 11 Environmental Science - Workplace pathway (SVN3E) is strongly recommended for students interested in enrolling in a general senior science course for their third science credit. 

 

Grade 12 Students

  At the present time, both Grade 12 Earth and Space Science (SES4M) and Grade 12 Science, Workplace (SNC4E) are NOT available.

 

 


What is Chemistry and Its Areas of Study?

 

 Chemistry is the study of matter, its properties, and composition, and its interaction with other matter plus with energy.  Examples of matter in chemistry can be as small as the particles making up an atom.  Examples of energy in chemistry include light, heat, electrical, sound, among others.

  There are many specialties within Chemistry.  Some of these to learn at DMT include the following:

  • Organic (study of chemicals found in living things, especially ones made of a backbone of carbon atoms)
  • Biochemistry (study of chemical principles and that permit life to happen in living things)
  • Inorganic (study of all chemicals, particularly of metals)
  • Physical (study of properties of chemicals and the rates and energies of their reactions)
  • Analytical (study of identifying and quantifying chemicals in a mixture).

 

Benefits of Studying Chemistry

  Have you ever wondered how an autumn leaf turns red?  How are vegetables coloured differently? Why does food cook faster in a pressure cooker?  Why do onions make you cry?  How does soap clean?  What's the difference between bad cholesterol and good cholesterol?  Why is smoking so harmful?  Why is the sky blue?  Why does coffee keep you awake?  Why are people lactose intolerant?  Is there real chemistry behind attraction and love?  Why do people love chocolate?

  Chemistry is the study of everything that is around you and about you; everything that you can touch, taste, and smell is chemistry.  Everything around us is changing between one type of matter is interacting with another type.  Every life is being lived by changes in chemistry.  Understanding these changes in chemistry can help you to understand our environment, improve our quality of life, and prolong it.

  Just as every word in the English language (over 750,000!) are assembled    by selecting from 26 different letters, every chemical known to us is made by a selection from 100 different atoms.  With this understanding, chemists can rearrange these different atoms in a laboratory to make products to improve our lives.  Applied chemistry has produced synthetic (non-natural) products that no natural product can do:  Steel is more durable and malleable; plastic   is more durable, flexible, insulating, and light-weight; Kevlar is light-weight, durable, and strong; pharmaceutical drugs can alleviate pain and prolong life.

  Our understanding of chemistry today has also been used for cooking and preserving different foods, reproducing natural chemicals like insulin to alleviate diabetes, controlling pests at home and in the field, cleaning up household messes like greasy pans and environmental pollution like oil spills, and speeding up communication within computers.

  Chemistry has continued to revolutionize industries like agriculture, manufacturing, health, communication, and transportation. Chemistry offers an exciting variety of opportunities in our future.

 

What Can Studying Chemistry Teach Me for Success in Life?

  Chemistry is all around us and within us.  Everything changes because of chemical reactions.  Understanding chemistry enables us to better understand our environment and how it changes.  Studying chemistry can help you to become more learned on the science behind the makeup of materials.  After high school, you can be more educated about the chemistry, both beneficial and harmful aspects, behind common household materials like dishwashing detergent, glass, metals, mothballs, oils, plastics, and pesticides, among others.

  Chemistry is an abstract subject; you cannot see the makeup and changes of chemicals at the most basic level.  Therefore, studying chemistry teaches you how to think and understand at the tiny microscopic level.  For instance, you already know that boiling water requires you to know that water has the formula H2O and it exists as steam at 1000C at room temperature.  However, knowledge of the angular geometry of H2O molecules that create for themselves a polarity, and consequent intermolecular force, helps us to better understand why water boils at 1000C at room temperature.  By practicing the creation of mental images and paying close attention to details, students learn to make connections between the macroscopic (visible) and microscopic, abstract world. Students practice using their imagination to create a possible solution by piecing together information that is available.  This can be an important skill to have in your future when you may need a creative solution to a problem.

  Chemistry can also teach you symbolic skills.  Communication in chemistry involves interpretation of chemical symbols, formulas, and equations. Understanding their meaning can be complicated.  To illustrate this point, we all can understand the expression:  3 apples + 3 apples = 6 apples.  Without practice in interpreting chemical symbols, interpreting the expression 6 NaOH + 3 Cl2 --> 5 NaCl + NaClO3 +  3 H2O is not as straight-forward.  With practice in examining a chemical equation numerically and symbolically, you can improve as a visual learner and interpreter.

  Concepts in chemistry are connected with other areas of science.  Students learn to integrate their research in chemistry to biology, physics, math and statistics, geology, computer, education and/or business, among others.  As well, studying chemistry in society makes aware of issues of safety, environmental impact, and financial impact in creating chemical products.  By completing investigations that actual chemists conduct, such as measuring pesticide concentrations in a lake, comparing the fat content in chips, and isolating chemicals producing a fruity odour, students are exposed to and thinking about applications of chemistry to other issues and subjects relevant in their future.  You can receive a comprehensive education on many subjects and how they relate to each other. (Perhaps you may even realize, only after studying chemistry, that your interests in learning is embedded in another subject!)

  To succeed in chemistry, one ought to be curious, look forward to challenges, and motivated to solving problems successfully.  Chemistry, as a science, requires you to use the fundamental principles of scientific investigation.  Experiments must be planned using logical reasoning to solve problems.  To answer the question of an experiment, a student thinks of a justified reason for the kind of observations to make, how to make them, and why.  Without careful planning, valued time, energy, and resources can be wasted.  You can develop this important skill of planning carefully.

  By studying chemistry, students learn to become resourceful.  They learn new technical terminology and practice research for the right kinds of information. Chemists continually read about new things.  Chemistry involves technical knowledge of equipment and procedures.  Chemistry is a very hands-on subject and collecting data using precise measurements builds up students' mechanical skills and instills patience during experiments.  Many types of measuring probes are used as data is entered into a computer.  You can learn and improve your computing skills, including computer modelling, in determining how your data can best be displayed for presentation and analysis.

  Observations and analysis of data are important parts of any experiment.  Communication skills are practiced whenever student decides how their data is best presented visually for analysis.  Students practice discussing, orally and in writing, the meaning of any patterns identified in the data.  By practicing conveying technical information to an audience less familiar with chemistry, students learn to become better teachers.  In analyzing data, students pay close attention to details in the data, find errors in their scientific method, and make self-corrections through the practice of deduction and logical reasoning.  Beyond high school, you can extend these skills of perseverance and learning to consider alternative viewpoints.

  Students are given opportunities to investigate work independently, fostering self-discipline.  Opportunities for collaborating with peers in completing research, peer evaluating, and solve problems builds team-work and leadership skills.

 

Keys for Students' Success in Learning Chemistry

  To be successful in a chemistry course, you ought to enjoy preparing yourself for challenges.  You ought to enjoy learning but more so really enjoy understanding how everything works.

  It is essential that you be comfortable with math and applying it to solve problems, because there is a lot of it! (It is strongly recommended that you enroll in as many math courses - Algebra, geometry, calculus - as possible so that you are equipped to solve many more chemistry challenges.)

  It is also important that you enjoy the challenges of thinking to solve problems.  Skills not only in math, but organizing data, looking for patterns, and logic reasoning will be practiced.

  Familiarity with the computer is very helpful.  You will learn to use different sensor probes for collecting data.  After transferring data to a computer, you will need to use a program for organizing and presenting your data collected in a meaningful way for analyses.

  Like anything that is worth being proud of, chemistry is also a lot of work.  Even the most brilliant physicists had to study regularly.  Paying attention in class and taking notes, reviewing the notes while reading and adding notes if the book explained a concept better or different than the teacher in class.  Look at examples and complete practice questions, even if they are not going to be taken up in class.  All of these habits, even if you did not need to apply them before, are essential now in chemistry.

  Because chemistry is the study of matter and energy all around and about us, you will find the chemistry questions so interesting that you are motivated to solve more.  You may find yourself working alone, but you will also be given opportunities to work alongside fellow eager students and teachers.

 

  The Science Department is always looking for new ways to make our courses both challenging and interesting. Our courses offer students the opportunity to learn through practical experiments, problem solving, and use of computers. Homework is seen as an essential part of students learning.

  The time to get serious about your marks and thinking about your future is now.  Your academic success in Grades 11 and 12 are going to be more important than ever!  Many Canadian universities are considering Grade 11 marks for early admissions. Our goal as DMT teachers is to help you plan your goals for successes both in your courses this year and afterwards, plus work towards achieve them successfully.

  To ensure that you can be successful, it is just as important to enroll in the chemistry course best suited to meet your interests and goals for your future.

 

What To Do If You Are Failing Chemistry

  Express your concern to your teacher.  Ask your teacher for specific suggestions on what you can do to pass.  Many of the assessments (some quizzes or assignments) in the course are considered as "assessments for" (diagnostic and formative) and "assessment as" (formative).  The purpose of these assessments is to act as a "self-check" to see that you are learning newly-taught material.  You are expected to make mistakes as it is evidence that you can learn.  These assessments do not count toward your final mark.  Ask you teacher again if the quizzes and/or assignments that you failed are such assessments.

  Your teacher respects an honest effort, even if you started late.  Continue to come to class and on-time because it makes a big difference.  Continue to take notes from your teacher and write down notes from the board because what s/he says and writes are important.  Continue to seek notes from a classmate and see if your note-taking skills can improve: Perhaps your classmate wrote down notes that you felt were not important or you notes can be made neater.  Continue to start your homework and try to complete it.  Continue to complete as many problem-solving questions as you can because you will become more comfortable with the concepts to try others.

 

What To Do If You Feel Like Withdrawing From Chemistry

  Give yourself credit if you have been doing your very best.  If you have tried everything but can not produce the results that you want, give yourself a break.  Be assured that nobody has ever been perfect and every successful person in history has failed at something.  It is a part of life; however, how you handle this can affect your academic future.  Please discuss this feeling with your teacher.  S/he can offer some advice or suggestions that you did not think of before.

  Consider your options carefully.  Do not regret your actions or words later.

  If you have not put forth the effort to study, complete your homework and/or hand in assignments, for whatever reason, it is worth considering the option to withdraw.  If you are going to withdraw, be sure to do so before the Full Disclosure Date one week after Midterms.  Your failing mark will not be recorded on your Ontario Student Transcript.

  If you withdraw from the course after the Full Disclosure Date, your failing mark will be recorded on your Ontario Student Transcript.  This poor mark will lower your academic average, harming your chances of meeting admission targets for university or college.

  After withdrawing from the course, you can discuss remaining in the class as an auditor.  When auditing a course, the student attends lessons but is not awarded the course credit.  However, it is worth considering because information learned may "stick with you" and you can be more prepared if you choose to repeat the course in the future.

 


Last Updated on Sunday, 30 March 2014 17:34
 
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